Sidney Crosby's hilarious words after Gordie Howe wanted a photo of him autographed

Sidney Crosby’s hilarious words after Gordie Howe wanted a photo of him autographed

Sidney Crosby had some of his prime years in the NHL ruined by injuries.

But he will, without a doubt, go down as one of the greatest players of all time when he eventually calls it a career.

Crosby has been the face of the franchise in Pittsburgh since getting drafted first overall in 2005. The expectations on Crosby were enormous, but he’s managed to exceed them all.

Crosby continues to dominate the NHL despite being 36 years old. He’s putting up ridiculous numbers, adding to a career already destined for the Hall of Fame.

Crosby is also one of the most respected and well-liked players in hockey history. He’s a great captain and leader and does so many great things in the community. And Crosby has also earned the respect of some of hockey’s greatest of all time.

When Sidney Crosby turned 32, The Athletic shared a great story about Crosby and Gordie Howe shortly after Sidney Crosby had won the Olympics for Canada with a game-winning goal in overtime.

After a game in Detroit not long after the Olympics goal, reporters stood outside the visitor’s locker room, waiting for Crosby.

Suddenly, Gordie Howe showed up with a picture of Sidney Crosby celebrating his game-winning goal against the United States in his hands. Howe walked up to Crosby, shook hands with him, and said, “I need your autograph on this.”

Crosby didn’t see it coming, and he didn’t know what to say.

“You’re Gordie Howe. You don’t want my autograph.”

But Howe insisted, “I sure as hell do.”

Source: Getty

Eventually, Crosby signed the photo, and then they shook hands again before Howe left. Still in shock over what just happened, Crosby turned to the reporters and hilariously said, “When he shakes your hand, it feels like your hand is going to break. God, he’s still strong.”

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